2014 Finalists

DXN_asm_viewC
Permalink Gallery

Watershed Erratics

Watershed Erratics

$4500
APPROX. 2.1M X 0.9M
WOOD, LAG BOLTS, STEEL, PAINT
This artwork presents two tall buoys, a left hand and right hand, at odds with each other and whimsically out of place on dry ground. They are inspired by flood events at the Evergreen Brickworks and in the lower Don Valley that are widely reported but experienced by few. They present the Brickworks as a flooded site and are a starting point for further contemplation of the effects of rapid construction of urban hardscapes on the vulnerable Don River watershed system. Constructed of salvaged local wood from recent extreme weather events painted red and green, this sculpted pair takes the iconic form of port and starboard upstream navigation buoys. Have they been torn from their anchorages and moved to this spot by a powerful hydraulic force? Have they been installed as navigation aids marking safe passage in anticipation of future rising water levels? Are they foreign objects designed to provoke curiosity and encourage further contemplation on environmental change, city building, conservation, water management and their collective effects on the Don River watershed? Is flooding a sign that the Don River is under stress, or is it a return to nature. Navigation buoys reveal nothing of their bulbous buoyant substructures as they float upright marking safe passage. Marooned and fully exposed they are an alarming sight and a clear warning to proceed with caution.

Cayuga_01
Permalink Gallery

Best of Show – Cayuga

Best of Show – Cayuga

,

2500.00 (per unit)
60” wide x 62” deep x 17- 27” high (per unit)
Seat Deck: salvaged wood from The City of Toronto (ice storm and or ash borer) -Base: a lightweight composite of cement/ wood chips (City of Toronto wood yard) and straw.
Cayuga is a modular outdoor (and indoor) public seating system. Its sculptural puzzle- like shape allows for multiple configurations creating an undulating topography that speaks to the multiple layers of glacial till that form the landscape in this part of southern Ontario. The wood seating deck (utilizing salvaged wood) is warm, friendly and inviting. The cement/ wood composite base is solid, durable and references the kind of technology used to form the bricks produced in the Brickworks kilns. The idea is to employ something we have been experimenting with, a hybrid of cement, wood chips from The City of Toronto wood lots and straw. This will produce a super strong and durable cement composite (essentially a hybrid sustainable indigenous technology) that should stand up well to outdoor public use.