2012 Finalists

Random Sphere_light
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Random Sphere and Void

Random Sphere and Void

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Random Sphere and Random Void
Reclaimed, culled and dressed wood; and recycled and reformed glass. One LED lighting system
Fly Freeman and Francis Muscat
Muscat-Freeman
muscatfreeman.com/muscatfreeman/
Random Sphere: $5000; Random Void: $7000

We propose two pieces for this design competition: Random Void and Random Sphere. Together they are a discussion on the forming of shapes through the additive process of construction found very frequently in nature: a seemingly random accretion of very similar pieces creating strong and deliberate forms. The are of Random Sphere is the exact shape of the space inside Random Void and is designed for inside spaces, and Random Void is a sculpture/shelter created for the exterior: a discourse on interior and exterior spaces.

Random Sphere and Void also discuss different aspects of active and passive lighting: Random Sphere is a light sources using high efficiency LED lights; and Random Void is a light container, with the wood structure blocking out the light. except that which penetrates via the glass bars that come to the internal surface of the void, creating a magical patter of coloured light on the inside of the space.

While both structures aim to delight the viewer,Random Void is also designed to delight the children who are a large part of the visitors to the Brick Works. The space created is the perfect size for the children to enter into and enjoy the play of light formed by the glass pieces.

Both the interior and exterior pieces are made from a mix of reclaimed and culled wood, and recycled glass which is reformed to long bars that echo the shape of the wood pieces.

Shrine

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Shrine: dedicated to the memory of demolished barns and fallen trees
Elm reclaimed from a demolished barn and Maple from the forests of Bancroft.
Lubo Brezina and Scott Eunson
Lubo Design
www.lubodesign.com
n/a

The Shrine is a reaction to the loss of farm land due to suburban sprawl north of Toronto. Our goal is to evoke the memory of the primeval forest: the wood, the farm land, the barn, its structure and space. On display is not only the material but the spirit of the material’s past, first as a living tree, and later as a component of a larger building.

The Shrine is made to provide an experience of varying scales. Visitors can simultaneously experience a lofty space and the intimacy of a mortise and tenon detail. Made of barn wood, the structure is solid enough to climb on, to sit on or to lie on.

The Shrine has been exhibited at four different venues. Each time we use the context to inform an addition to the structure. If selected the shrine would be further developed as an outdoor pavilion, a place for rest and contemplation.

Node Garden Jack
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Node Garden Jack

Node Garden Jack

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NODE Garden Jack
Decommissioned Propane
Ryan Wilding and Jano Badovina
Fugitive Glue

https://www.facebook.com/FugitiveGlue

$8000.00

‘Node’ will be a sculptural art installation suitable for exterior spaces at the Evergreen Brick Works campus. The piece involves re-purposing de-commissioned 100 lb propane tanks into a large ornamental structure.

This sculpture can be used as an impact presence in an unlikely location, such as a parking lot or promenade, or can be placed in a garden as an aid for growing vines and other greenery. It can be used to stick out or become one with it’s environment. The Node can be covered with a special seeded paint that will promote the growth of moss, creating a bio-sculpture. The inspiration for this work comes from biological and molecular growths in nature such as starbursts, sprouting seeds and tree branch nodes. The re-use of propane tanks also enforce this point as a new life is given to an end of life-cycle product.

Our Methodology:

UP-HOARDING is a process that combines the collection aspect of hoarding and the creation aspect of up-cycling with the key aspect of pre-meditation, to engineer a practical method of turning waste into new and useful objects:

  1. We find and recognize the waste object that is available in large quantities.
  2. We develop the product design that is practical, long lasting, and aesthetic.
  3. We collect the waste items to be re-manufactured into new products.
  4. We only use low-impact, ecologically responsible manufacturing processes.
Slash Pile Bench
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Slash Pile Bench

Slash Pile Bench

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Slash Pile Bench
Cast off Cedar limbs and Stainless Steel bands
Joel Harrisonoff
Agostinis and Harrison-Off Design Institute
joelharrisonoff.com/
$750.00

Slash Pile Bench is composed of the cut off limbs from felled Cedar trees which have been cut down for fence posts, lumber etc… The limbs are bound tightly together and locked in position under tension with stainless steel banding. Typically the limbs are cast aside and left as slash or chipped into mulch. After the bandings are in place, a seat is carved out of the bundle of cedar sticks. The finished piece is quite heavy and difficult to move making it good for public spaces. Cedar is a relatively good outdoor wood and is fairly resistant to rot. Stainless steel will also hold up to outdoor conditions. The overall piece has a rustic feel with some modern lines making it suitable for the aesthetic appearance of the brick works and surrounding area. The “Big Idea” here being the use of a byproduct waste being used in a relatively simple and repeatable product that comes across as quite sculptural and yet still retains some practicality.